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Get an unbiased snapshot of the unauthorized immigration population in the US.

FULL ARTICLE HERE

Beginning March 1, 2019 your Behavioral Health Benefits will be through Optum Behavioral Health instead of Aetna Behavioral Health. If you or your eligible dependent(s) are currently utilizing the behavioral health benefits, download the Transition of Care Letter below which will help guide you during this transition from Aetna to Optum.

If you are currently utilizing the Behavioral Health benefits, let your current provider know that we are changing from AETNA to Optum. If your provider is in the Optum Network, you don’t need to do anything except provide your new ID card. If your provider is not in the Optum Network, you will need to contact the Benefit Office at 314-644-2777 ext. 2 to access the Transition of Care benefit.

Please note: Optum Behavioral Health is different from your pharmacy vendor, OptumRX. You should not experience any changes with your pharmacy benefit.

*This change only applies to Active and Non-Medicare Retiree participants.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE TRANSITION OF CARE LETTER

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NEW PB4U FROM THE MIDWEST REGION

US SILICA/MISSISSIPPI SAND in Festus, MO aim to take overtime pay away from their employees.

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Click here for the endorsements for the STL City Primary on March 5th, 2019.

Reminder that February 28th is the deadline to pay your 2019 dues in full for the year and receive a $34 gift card to Schnucks!

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Our January issue of Lifelines looked at the connection between workers being injured on the job and the increased risk for opioid use and abuse. Construction consistently ranks among the most dangerous occupations in the U.S., so it makes sense that construction laborers are more likely to be in pain – and seek relief from that pain – than the average employee. It’s been difficult to pin down the extent of this increased risk, however. In some of the areas that have been hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, that data is now emerging. Unfortunately, it paints a very troubling picture for the construction industry.

Joint analysis by the Ohio Department of Health and the Cleveland Plain Dealer found that construction workers in Ohio were seven times more likely to die of an opioid overdose than workers in other professions. Their risk was the highest of any occupation. Between 2010 and 2016, construction workers accounted for nearly one in seven fatal overdoses in the state of Ohio. These numbers aren’t unique to Ohio, either. In Barnstable county in Massachusetts – better known as the popular summer destination Cape Cod – a study of overdose deaths from 2004 to 2014 found that construction workers accounted for 25 percent of all fatal overdoses from prescription painkillers, heroin or fentanyl. This is despite the fact that constr...

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Benefits for LIUNA Members

The LIUNA Fringe Benefits Program provides quality health insurance and pension benefits for union Laborers.

The LIUNA Training Program Prepares You for the Future